The Next Blue Wave Could Be a Tsunami

Forgive me for counting chickens, but one needs to cherish good news. Here are some reasons to be hopeful for 2020, big-time.

The Trump presidency is finally coming apart, just as the voters are repudiating it. This took longer than a lot of commentators expected, given Trump’s sheer lunacy. But his several moves to dislodge Special Counsel Robert Mueller backfired, and Mueller’s report, now expected imminently, will be seriously damaging.

Secondly, the election news keeps getting better. The Dems have flipped their 40th seat, in California’s Central Valley. Mike Espy lost the election for a Mississippi seat by only eight points, the best that a Democrat, let alone a black Democrat, has done in the Lynching State—excuse me, the Magnolia State—in decades.

The fact that so many African-American candidates won seats in heavily white majority districts, many of them in Trump Country, suggests that maybe the hatred stoked by Trump is beginning to recede. By my count, there are another 15 House seats that Democrats lost by six points or less, so they could pick up more next time.

The Trump administration is not going to get more attractive as it ages. Trump will be more and more on the defensive, and that will contribute to the fragmentation of the Republican Party, like ships deserting a sinking rat.

GOP support for Trump was always purely opportunistic and transactional. Republican desertion of Trump will be the same. These people are not renowned for their loyalty. In that respect, Trump’s paranoia is rooted in reality.

Progressives will have more influence in the House than in a very long time, and the fact that Nancy Pelosi is welcoming them and will be re-elected speaker is good news for both.

All of this bodes well for 2020—not just for a Democratic win, but for a progressive Democratic win. Even the prospects of taking back the Senate look decent, with seven vulnerable Republican seats and just three needed for a Democratic takeover.

Hey, Bob, pass over whatever it is that you’re smoking. No, I’m quite sober and quite serious. It’s been so long since we’ve had good news that we’re hesitant to celebrate it.

Needless to say, it will take continuing hard work and mobilization. But does anyone doubt that the progressive energy will continue to build?

By |2018-11-28T21:12:28+00:00November 28th, 2018|Kuttner on TAP|0 Comments

About the Author:

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect as well as a Demos Distinguished Senior Fellow. He was a longtime columnist for Business Week, and continues to write columns in the Boston Globe. He co-founded the Economic Policy Institute in Washington and serves on its executive committee.

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